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OUR MISSION

The Black Political Empowerment Project (B-PEP) was launched May 21, 1986 to ensure that the Pittsburgh African-American community votes in every single election. B-PEP relies on the dedication of agencies, organizations, religious leaders, and committed individuals who donate incredible amounts of hours to uplift our communities and provide a sense of purpose.

We Are:

  • Advocating that ALL African Americans are registered to vote and that they embrace the mission: “It’s a LIFETIME COMMITMENT …African Americans VOTE in EACH and EVERY election!

  • Advocating that those in political office move to expeditiously and effectively meet the needs, aspirations, and concerns of the African American population they are elected to serve.

  • Recognizing the pivotal and powerful connection between a consistently high voting pattern in the African American community and its impact on the political process.

B-PEP has been fortunate to have received support from many area corporations and agencies, including the Heinz Endowments, the Pittsburgh Foundation, the POISE Foundation, the Three Rivers Community Foundation, and the nationally recognized Ford Foundation.

In addition to ensuring African-Americans participate in the voting process, B-PEP oversees the Greater Pittsburgh Coalition Against Violence (CAV), and the Corporate Equity and Inclusion Roundtable (CEIR). B-PEP is also a part of the Non-Profit Voter Engagement Network. 

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OUR INITIATIVES

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Greater Pittsburgh Coalition Against Violence

To create long-term solutions to deep-rooted problems, to build more peaceful communities! 

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Corporate Equity & Inclusion Roundtable

Focused on bringing together more leaders from the corporate, college and university, and non-profit communities to examine strategies, programs and activities aimed at increasing meaningful diversity, equity and inclusion throughout the Region.

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The Annual B-PEP Jazz Fundraiser

Come and enjoy a fantastic night of good music while helping B-PEP raise funds for the important work that we do in the community.

August Wilson African American Cultural Center

A Brief Historical Overview of Tim Stevens’ Involvement with the August Wilson African American Cultural Center

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Efforts to save the August Wilson Cultural Center

“The August Wilson Center was designed as the hub of African-American culture in our city and it is vital for it to remain so” - Tim Stevens, April 2014

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Removal and Restoration of “African-American” name in the August Wilson Cultural Center

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“Our goal was to put African-American name back on the building, and one of the suggestions I have for the board moving forward would be to get a commitment from them that this language will stay, and this issue will be resolved quickly”
- Tim Stevens, March 2019

Tim Stevens’ official statement to Janis Burley Wilson, CEO and President of the August Wilson Center, and Ronald Lee Newman, Manager of the August Wilson Center, regarding the removal of the name “African-American” from the building name.

Petition started by Renee Wilson, community activist and cousin of August Wilson, on Change.org to restore African American name back to the August Wilson Center, permanently.

Tim Stevens’ official statement to Janis Burley Wilson, CEO and President of the August Wilson Center, and Ronald Lee Newman, Manager of the August Wilson Center. regarding the removal of the name “African-American” from the building name.

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“We heard from our friends and allies the depth of feeling associated with having ‘African American’ present in the institutional branding, and we believe it is an upside compromise to include it”

— Janis Burley Wilson